For Teachers

Healthy living school assembly

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The downloadable slides for this assembly plan can be found at the bottom of this page.

The assembly can be used in school to support teaching and learning about healthy living.

The colourful illustrations and simple information make it a great resource.

It introduces children to the three Great Grub Club ways of being healthy, covering the importance of eating 5 A DAY, being snack-wise and being physically active for at least 60 minutes every day.

The resource was reviewed in 2015 by a team of teachers, scientists and nutritionists and is based on World Cancer Research Fund's Recommendations for Cancer Prevention.

Teacher's notes

Slide 1

Explain to children that you are going to look at the three Great Grub Club ways of being healthy.

Slide 2

Ask the children what ‘being healthy’ means to them.

Explain to the children that being healthy means keeping well, which includes eating healthily and being active, and also feeling happy.

Remind children that to be healthy they need to make sure they eat a range of foods from all of the different food groups – vegetables and fruits, starchy foods like bread, rice, potatoes and pasta, dairy foods like milk and yoghurt, and protein foods like chicken, fish, eggs, lentils and beans.

Remind children that to be healthy they should also be active for at least 60 minutes each day, but that doesn’t have to be all in one go.

Slide 3

Introduce the children to the three Great Grub Club ways of being healthy:

  • 5 A DAY
  • Be snack wise
  • 60 minutes

Slide 4

Explain to the children that a good way to eat plenty of vegetables and fruits is to make sure that we eat at least five portions every day. Explain that this should ideally be a mixture of different vegetables and fruits.

Ask some of the children what their favourite vegetable or fruit is.

Explain to the children that a child’s portion of vegetables and fruits is roughly what can fit into their cupped hand. Ask children to show you their cupped hand.

Explain to the children that eating at least five or more portions of vegetables and fruits a day gives us some of the nutrients our bodies need to work properly. Introduce the term ‘nutrients’ and explain that these are in foods and help to keep our bodies strong and healthy.

Different kinds of foods have different kinds of nutrients and some foods have more nutrients than others, which is why we need to eat a variety of foods.

For older children, introduce the word ‘vitamin’ and explain that vitamins are a type of nutrient. Introduce the idea that vegetables and fruits contain lots of vitamins such as vitamin A and vitamin C, as well as fibre. Explain that vitamin A helps to keep our eyes healthy. Vitamin C helps to keep our skin healthy and helps our skin heal quickly. Both vitamins are very important to help keep our bodies healthy. Fibre is good for us because it helps food to move through our bodies and it helps us to go to the toilet regularly.

Slide 5

Explain to the children that it is even better for us if we eat vegetables and fruits from different colours of the rainbow, as a range of different coloured vegetables and fruits contains more of the important nutrients that our bodies need.

Explain that there are many different coloured vegetables and fruits available, as shown on the slide.

Point at some of the vegetables and fruits in the picture and invite the children to name them.

You could also split children into groups and give them a colour each. They could work together to name all the items in that colour.

Slide 6

Reveal the names of the vegetables and fruits in the picture, pointing out some of the more uncommon items (e.g. papaya, asparagus, pomegranate).

Explain to the children that with so many tasty vegetables and fruits to chose from it’s so easy to eat five portions of vegetables and fruits each day.

Encourage them to do so by providing examples of how easy it is, eg, they could add a sliced banana to their breakfast cereal, add some crunchy salad to their lunchtime sandwich, or snack on an apple or dried fruits.

Slide 7

Explain to the children that we must make sure we eat the right kind of snacks and that high-fat/high-sugar snacks are not the healthiest option.

Explain that all foods provide energy and some foods provide more energy than others. Explain that high-fat/high-sugar snacks contain a lot of energy and are fine as a treat but should not be eaten every day.

Slides 8–13

Explain to the children that they are going to see six pictures of snacks and they need to stand up if they think the snack is not healthy and sit down if they think the snack is healthy.

Older children could also sort out the pictures of snacks in order of high energy to low energy. Correct order:

  1. Caramel-filled chocolate bar – 520 kCal per 100g
  2. Chocolate chip cookies – 474 kCal/100g.
  3. Plain muffin – 223 kCal/100g.
  4. Cherries – 48 kCal/100g.
  5. Oranges – 37 kCal/100g.
  6. Pepper – 20 kCal/100g.

Remind children that pepper or carrot sticks, a handful of raisins or a piece of fruit make great healthy snacks. Eating this kind of snack will help them eat five portions of vegetables and fruits each day.

Slide 14

Explain to the children that they should be active for at least 60 minutes each day, but that doesn’t have to be all in one go. Ask some of the children for examples of physical activity. Explain that any kind of physical activity is good for us because it helps our bodies work properly and that we use different amounts of energy for different kinds of physical activity.

Explain to the children that when we do high intensity exercise we feel out of breath, we sweat and our hearts beat more quickly. Invite children to run fast on the spot to show them what high intensity exercise does to their body. High intensity exercise uses more energy than low intensity exercise and so is good for us.

Explain to them that you are going to show them 10 examples of different exercises.

Slides 15–24

Invite the children to act out each action one at a time, e.g. swimming, walking on the spot, etc.

Older children could sort out exercise pictures into high intensity and low intensity. High intensity exercises are: skipping, racing, dancing, swimming and cycling quickly. Low intensity exercises are: playing frisbee, walking to school, gardening, ice skating and horse riding.

Slide 25

Ask the children how many portions of vegetables and fruits they should eat each day.

Ask the children to give examples of healthy snacks.

Ask the children how long they should be active for each day.

Slide 26

Invite the children to visit the Great Grub Club website to play interactive games, discover fun food facts and learn that being healthy is fun!

Useful site content

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